IV.   Implementation of the Comprehensive Plan

 

A. Summary

 

The Town of Menasha Smart Growth Comprehensive Plan is intended to guide all decisions related to community development in the Town of Menasha. All public and private sector community development related decisions should be made in the context of the Plan’s goals, objectives, policies and recommendations. Specifically, the Plan should be used as a guide when site plans are reviewed, rezonings are proposed, conditional use requests are considered, subdivision plats are reviewed and public utility improvements or extensions are proposed. The Plan should be used to evaluate the impact of proposed development projects on existing land uses, transportation system facilities, utility systems, park and recreation facilities and other municipal services and facilities prior to issuing permits to commence construction, divide land, occupy buildings, etc.

 

This section of the plan outlines the actions for Town of Menasha officials to follow and implement over the next 20 years of the plan (from 2002 – 2022). Implementation will take the form of adopting and implementing a number of regulations, ordinances and policies.

 

B.   Levels of Services Standards

 

Through the use of Levels of Services Standards, the Town of Menasha will have a framework to use in reviewing and responding to requests for development and redevelopment. It will provide the staff, the Plan Commission and the Town Board with quantifiable standards for the range of services provided by the Town and needed by its residents. The standards will help to ensure that the goals, objectives and policies of this comprehensive plan are achieved.

 

In the spirit of intergovernmental and regional cooperation, the Town of Menasha has looked to work done by the East Central Regional Planning Commission. In the Addendum to the Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan for the Fox Cities, Oshkosh and Fond du Lac Urban Areas (adopted in October 2000), East Central addressed the need to provide certain levels of urban services in urban areas. The recommended levels of services were based on density for residential land uses and on the projected daily wastewater flow for commercial and industrial land uses.

 

According to East Central, development should only occur when the facilities and services are available to support that development. The Town of Menasha supports this concept. In this section, the use of Levels of Services Standards and their applicability to residential, commercial and industrial development in the Town of Menasha are discussed.

 

To assist in the development and application of Levels of Service Standards, East Central divided urban services into four categories:

 

Ø       Infrastructure Services include sanitary sewer, water distribution and storage, storm water handling, and street networks.

Ø       Environmental Services include recreation and parks, and conservation.

Ø       Health and Human Safety Services include law enforcement, fire protection, and emergency medical services.

Ø       Social Services include education, public buildings, and library services.

 

Threshold levels for Infrastructure Services and Environmental Services are listed in Table X1 Residential Density Standards Matrix – Part A and in Table X3 Levels of Services for Commercial and Industrial Development. East Central based the standards in these two tables on the growth management and urban service delivery goals, policies and objectives contained in the Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan for the Fox Cities, Oshkosh and Fond du Lac Urban Areas. The densities in the residential tables were formulated from recent development patterns within the urban planning area.

 

The criteria listed in these two tables are the minimum levels of services that should be provided to development projected at each of the levels. The Town of Menasha may provide, or require, a higher level of service for a particular development if it so desires. It is important for the Town to know that providing a lower level of service than those listed in Part A might result in East Central denying requests for new sewer service allocations in future sewer service plan updates.

 

The suggested levels of Health and Human Safety Services and Social Services developed by East Central are shown in Table X2 Residential Density Standards Matrix – Part B. While the standards in Part A are criteria to be met by new development, the standards in Part B are suggested goals to strive for throughout the community. Part B standards for police, fire, and ambulance are recommended guidelines from national professional organizations, such as AMA and NFPA.

 

In contrast to Part A, sewer service allocations will not be denied by East Central to the Town of Menasha if it does not meet the Part B goals. The Town of Menasha should realize that as it continues to grow and as the characteristics of the residents of the Town changes, more Part B services may be required. East Central recommends that the Town of Menasha review its provision of these services at least once every five years, and make adjustments as needed.

 

The objective of these recommendations is to encourage growth within the urban planning area to develop in a manner consistent with the policies and objectives stated in the Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan while maintaining individual community character and identity. In keeping with that objective, the decision as to what level of land use development tier (high, medium or low density) the Town of Menasha wishes to achieve is the decision of the Town. However, East Central notes that the thresholds and standards shown in Tables X1, X2 and X3 are the degree of essential services to be provided. A more detailed narrative discussion of the thresholds and standards contained in the three tables may be found in the Appendix.

 


1.     Residential

 

In the Addendum to the Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan, East Central divided residential land uses into three density levels:

 

Ø       High Density is defined as those jurisdictions or portions of a jurisdiction that meet density standards of 3.0 residential units or more per gross acre, provide all essential urban services, and continue to plan new development at the appropriate density levels.

Ø       Medium Density is defined as those jurisdictions or portions of a jurisdictions where the residential density standards range between 1.0 and 2.99 units per acres and where new development is planned at 2.0 or greater.

Ø       Low Density is defined as those jurisdictions or portions of a jurisdiction where the residential density factor is less than 1, where essential urban services are not necessarily provided, and where development is limited.

 

These definitions are different from, and should not be confused with, the definitions given to residential land uses shown on the Town of Menasha Future Land Use Map. The Town defines high density residential as 12 or more units per acre, medium density as 6 to 11 units per acre and low density as 5 units or less per acre.

 

Because all future residential development within the Town of Menasha’s Sewer Service Area is projected to have a density of more than 3 units per acre, the High Density standards from Table’s X1 and X2 should be applied to all proposals for residential development inside the Town’s Sewer Service Area. Future residential development outside of the Town’s Sewer Service Area should be developed in accordance with the Low Density standards shown in Table’s X1 and X2.

 

It is recommended that the Town of Menasha review each of the levels of services in Table’s X1 and X2 to determine, where needed and/or applicable, the quantifiable standard that is appropriate.

 


TABLE X1

RESIDENTIAL DENSITY STANDARDS MATRIX – Part A

SERVICES

HIGH DENSITY

MEDIUM DENSITY

LOW DENSITY

Sanitary

Sewer

Full public sewer for all dwelling units

Primarily public sewer

Single family on-site sewer

 

On-site systems in very low density of 1 unit per acre or less

Other housing, full public sewer

Pipe size increases with density

Pipe size increases with density

 

Pipe length decreases with density

Pipe length decreases with density

 

Remain within treatment facility capacity

Remain within treatment facility capacity

Water

Supply

Full public water service for all dwelling units

Primarily public water

Private on-site wells

 

Private wells for very low density of 1 unit per acre or less

Pipe size increases with density

Pipe size increases with density

 

Pipe length decreases with density

Pipe length decreases with density

 

Adequate water pressure and flow to meet standards for fire protection and consumption

Adequate water pressure and fire flow to meet standards for fire protection and consumption

Adequate water pressure and flow to meet standards for fire protection and consumption

Storm Water

Full underground storm drainage system required for all development

Underground and surface mix required for all development

Surface drainage required for dense and commercial development

Pipe sizing as for sewer and water

Pipe sizing as for sewer and water

Pipe sizing as for sewer and water

 

Detention and retention as appropriate

Detention and retention as appropriate

Detention and retention as appropriate

 

Adequate to carry peak flow per design storm

Adequate to carry peak flow per design storm

Adequate to carry peak flow per design storm

Street

Network

Lighting, curb, gutters & sidewalk

Mix of lighting and curb & gutter or alternative effective storm water management

Sparse lighting; no curb, gutter, or sidewalk

Sidewalks or other distinct, maintained pedestrian corridors

Right of Way (ROW) and pavement width meets Level C standards for traffic flow

Right of Way (ROW) and pavement width meets Level C standards for traffic flow

Right of Way (ROW) and pavement width meets Level C standards for traffic flow

Parks and Recreation

10 acres of park land for every 1,000 residents

10 acres of park land for every 1,000 residents

A minimum of one community park at least 10 acres in size

A hierarchy of community and neighborhood parks; residential areas generally are within a half-mile radius of and have safe access to a neighborhood park

A hierarchy of community and neighborhood parks; residential areas generally are within a half-mile radius of and have safe access to a neighborhood park

Source: East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission – Addendum to the Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan for the Fox Cities, Oshkosh and Fond du Lac Urban Areas, adopted October 2000.

 


TABLE X2

RESIDENTIAL DENSITY STANDARDS MATRIX – Part B

SERVICES

HIGH DENSITY

MEDIUM DENSITY

LOW DENSITY

Police

Adequate number of officers to provide an average response time of 7 minutes; under 4 minutes for Code 1 and 2 calls.

Adequate number of officers to provide an average response time of 10 minutes; under 5 min. for Code 1 and 2 calls.

Adequate number of officers to provide an average response time of 15 minutes; under 6 min. for Code 1 & 2 calls.

Fire

Full time staff and chief. Average response time: 4 min

Partly on call staff. Average response time: 6 min

All on call staff. No full time staff. Average response time: 8 min

Ambulance

Fractile time response for 90% of calls: First responders arrive within 4 minutes, backup arrives in less than 8 minutes.

Fractile time response for 90% of calls: First responders arrive within 4 minutes, backup arrives in less than 10 minutes.

Fractile time response for 90% of calls: First responders arrive within 4 minutes, backup arrives in less than 12 minutes.

Schools

Plan for adequate capacity to absorb projected development

Plan for adequate capacity to absorb projected development

Plan for adequate capacity to absorb projected development

General Government

Central municipal building; specialized departments; full-time staff.

Central municipal building; fewer specialized departments; full-time and/or part-time staff

Central municipal building; few specialized departments; part-time staff

Library

18.3 service hours per week per 1,000 residents; 3.61 books per capita

18.3 service hours per week per 1,000 residents; 3.61 books per capita

18.3 service hours per week per 1,000 residents; 3.61 books per capita

Solid Waste

Weekly curbside by municipality

Weekly curbside by municipality or resident delivers to landfill

Weekly curbside by municipality or resident delivers to landfill

Source: East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission – Addendum to the Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan for the Fox Cities, Oshkosh and Fond du Lac Urban Areas, adopted October 2000.

 

 

 

 

 


2.     Commercial and Industrial

 

East Central has divided the levels of industrial and commercial development into three levels of services categories:

 

Ø       Category A includes industrial and commercial development that has a projected daily wastewater flow rate of 10,000 or more gallons. Establishments in this category can be expected to employ large numbers of people, generate considerable automobile and/or pedestrian traffic, require a high level of infrastructure development, and may place considerable demands on government services such as police and fire protection. Examples include, but are not limited to, warehouses, industrial parks, and shopping malls.

Ø       Category B includes industrial and commercial development that has a projected daily wastewater flow rate of less than 10,000 gallons. Establishments in this category still may generate considerable automobile and/or pedestrian traffic, but do not require the same level of infrastructure development as Category A businesses. Examples include, but are not limited to, furniture stores and neighborhood grocery stores.

Ø       Category C includes industrial and commercial development that requires no additional infrastructure beyond what would be expected in a low density environment. A low density commercial and industrial environment includes areas that have low traffic volumes, sparse development, and are located further away from medium and high density areas of development. Examples include, but are not limited to, home occupations and bed and breakfast establishments as defined in ILHR 51.01, mini-warehouses, landfills, and resource production and extraction.

 

Based on the assumption that all future commercial and industrial development will occur with the Town’s Sewer Service Area, it is recommended that the Category A standards be applied to all future new commercial and industrial development in the Town of Menasha, regardless of the development’s projected daily wastewater flow.

 

It is also recommended that existing commercial and industrial areas be reviewed and a determination made as to the category that is most appropriate for further development and redevelopment of existing commercial and industrial development. It is possible there may be areas where any one of the three will be the most appropriate.

 


TABLE X3

LEVELS OF SERVICES FOR COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

SERVICES

CATEGORY A

CATEGORY B

CATEGORY C

 

Street

Network

Lighting, curb, gutters

Mix of lighting, curb, & gutter

Sparse lighting; no curb or gutter

 

Safe distinctive provision for pedestrian and bicycle access

Safe distinctive provision for pedestrian and bicycle access

No sidewalks

Right of Way (ROW) and pavement width increase with density

Right of Way (ROW) and pavement width related to density

Right of Way (ROW) and pavement width relative to density

Storm Water

Fully engineered storm drainage system required for all development

Underground and surface mix required for all development

Surface Drainage

Pipe sizing as for sewer and water

Pipe sizing as for sewer and water

Pipe sizing as for sewer and water

 

Detention and retention as appropriate

Detention and retention as appropriate

Detention and retention as appropriate

 

Adequate to carry peak flow per design storm

Adequate to carry peak flow per design storm

Adequate to carry peak flow per design storm

Sanitary

Sewer

Full public sewer for all development

Primarily public sewer

On site systems

 

On-site systems for low daily waste water flow rates

Pipe size increases with density

Pipe size increases with density

 

Pipe length decreases with density

Pipe length decreases with density

 

Remain within treatment facility capacity

Remain within treatment facility capacity

Water Supply

Full public water service for all development

Primarily public water; water assessment required for establishments not on public water.

Private on site wells; water assessment for heavy users

Pipe size increases with density

Pipe size increases with density

 

Pipe length decreases with density

Pipe length decreases with density

 

Adequate water pressure and fire flow to meet standards for fire protection.

Adequate water pressure and fire flow to meet standards for fire protection.

Adequate water pressure and fire flow to meet standards for fire protection.

Source: East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission – Addendum to the Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan for the Fox Cities, Oshkosh and Fond du Lac Urban Areas, adopted October 2000.

 

 

 


3.     Transportation

 

One of the objectives in the Transportation Element calls for the establishment of levels of service for all roads with the Town of Menasha. Street and highway levels of service are typically broken down into the six categories shown below in Table X4. These standards can be used by the Town of Menasha to evaluate traffic operating conditions and identify congestion.

 

TABLE X4

LEVEL OF SERVICE FOR TRAFFIC FLOW

Level of Service

Characteristics

 

A

Free traffic flow. Under these conditions, transportation system users are virtually unaffected by other users and travel safety and comfort are very high.

 

B

Stable traffic flow. These conditions allow system users a significant amount of freedom to choose their own speeds, but a slight amount of interaction with others is common. Travel safety and comfort are also high.

 

C

Stable yet restricted traffic flow. Under these conditions, the amount of interaction with other transportation system users becomes significant and the general level of comfort and convenience begins to decline.

 

D

High-density traffic flows, lower speeds, and restricted maneuverability. These conditions generally create uncomfortable and inconvenient traveling conditions; however, traffic flow is typically stable.

 

E

Unstable traffic flow and volumes that are at or slightly above capacity. Under these conditions, system users experience poor comfort and convenience levels, and accident exposure is increased.

 

F

Forced flow, traffic queues, and stop-and-go situations. Under these conditions, the amount of traffic that is present on a facility exceeds the amount that can be served, which creates the problems mentioned above. System users will typically experience low comfort and convenience, poor travel times, and high accident exposure.

Source: East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission – Long-Range Transportation/Land Use Plan for the Fox Cities, Oshkosh and Fond du Lac Urban Areas, adopted July 1997.

 

Typically, Level of Service C is the minimum desirable level of service for a major roadway such as an arterial or collector. Whether or not an arterial or collector is at that level depends on a number of factors that may include the following:

 

Ø       Capacity (the width and number of lanes)

Ø       Average speed on the street

Ø       Number of turns (is the street straight or does it curve)

Ø       Number of access points (driveways and side streets)

Ø       Level of visibility (is the road hilly or flat)

Ø       Adjacent land uses (open agricultural or dense commercial)

 

Capacity and average speed are linked and are the two most commonly used factors in determining the level of service category. For example, a two-lane street with a higher speed limit may provide for a smoother traffic flow than a four-lane street with a lower speed limit.

 

Observation (subjective) and traffic counts (objective) should both be considered when determining the need for improvements to the street system. Generally speaking, the typical capacity of a collector street is 7,000 to 8,000 vehicles per day. As a point of comparison, the capacity for CTH CB is 20,000 vehicles per day on the four-lane segment south of East Shady Lane and 12,000 vehicles per day on the two-lane segment between East Shady Lane and CTH BB.

 

It is recommended that the Town of Menasha collect traffic count data for and schedule regular observations of traffic flow for the following streets that have been classified as collectors and for which the Town has construction and maintenance responsibility:

 

Ø       Irish Road

Ø       Cold Spring Road

Ø       East Shady Lane

Ø       Jacobsen Road

 

Based on the quantitative and qualitative data, a determination can then be made as to what level of service is currently characteristic of each of the four collectors. The analysis should also include the other factors identified above. The next step is to determine what improvements need to be made, if any, for each of the four collectors to be categorized as Level of Service C.

 

 


B.   Programs and Actions

 

1.           Adoption of the Plan

 

The Town of Menasha should formally adopt the Plan in accordance with Section 62.23 of the Wisconsin Statutes. The process includes holding a public hearing before the Planning Commission, after which the Commission adopts the Plan by resolution and certifies its recommendation to the Town Board, which in turn adopts the Plan.

 

2.           Zoning Ordinance

 

The Town of Menasha is presently zoned under the Winnebago County Zoning Ordinance. To implement the goals, objectives and policies and recommendations of the Comprehensive Plan, the Town should work closely with the Winnebago County Zoning Department in reviewing the Town-County Zoning Ordinance and the Town Zoning Map so that they are consistent with the recommendations of the Town’s Future Land Use Plan.

 

The Town of Menasha has a strong desire to adopt its own zoning ordinance and map. The Town continues to transition from a rural town functioning as a bedroom community to adjacent incorporated municipalities to an urban community in its own right. As a result, there are unique development challenges that are better addressed through and with a Town zoning ordinance and map.

 

Several discussions have already been held with Winnebago County. These discussions should continue.

 

3.           Official Maps

 

State Statutes Chapter 62.23 provide that the Plan Commission shall maintain an official map of the municipality that shows both present and proposed future roads, parks, and public facilities. The law limits compensation to private property owners who may construct buildings on designated future streets or public areas.

 

The Town of Menasha should review its Official Map Ordinance and Map to identify future collector and arterial type road corridors and to secure access at key points on existing streets, as shown on the Town’s Future Land Use Plan.

 

4.           Sign Ordinances

 

All signage on local and county roads is regulated by Winnebago County ordinances. The State of Wisconsin Department of Transportation regulates signage on state highways. However, the Town may consider adoption of a more restrictive sign code as either a “stand alone” ordinance or as part of a Site Plan review regulation.

 

 

5.           Erosion and Storm Water Control Ordinance

 

The Town of Menasha’s Subdivision Control Ordinance/Planned Unit Development specifies erosion, drainage and storm water requirements. The Town Engineer reviews and analyzes drainage on all plats.

 

The Town should continue to consider the formation of a storm water management district.

 

6.           Historic Preservation Ordinance

 

While the Town of Menasha does not have a historic preservation ordinance, the Town of Menasha Board resolves to support all property owners who seek to preserve historical buildings.

 

7.           Site Plan Regulations

 

The Town has a site plan review process. It should be reviewed to ensure it is compatible with the goals, objectives, policies and recommendations of this plan.

 

8.           Design Review Ordinances

 

The Town is considering drafting language that will be more specific as to the building and landscaping requirements the Town is seeking from developers who are submitting applications for the B-4 and B-5 Zoning Districts. With this language, it is hoped that the minimum level of design will be clearer and facilitate the review process.

 

9.           Landscaping Ordinance

 

The Town recently developed and adopted an ordinance on landscaping.

 

 

 

 

 

10.      Lighting Ordinance

 

The Town is currently researching the feasibility of an ordinance that can equitably and fairly address the issue of outdoor lighting and its impact on neighboring properties.

 

11.      Communications Tower Ordinance

 

The Town is currently considering developing a communications tower ordinance.

 

12.      Building Codes

 

Building codes in the Town of Menasha are enforced through the Building Inspector and follow all applicable local, state and federal standards.

 

13.      Mechanical Codes

 

Mechanical codes in the Town of Menasha are enforced through the Building Inspector and follow all applicable local, state and federal standards.

 

14.      Housing Codes

 

Housing codes in the Town of Menasha are enforced through the Building Inspector and follow all applicable local, state and federal standards.

 

15.      Sanitary Codes

 

Sanitary codes in the Town of Menasha are enforced through the Building Inspector and follow all applicable local, state and federal standards.

 

16.      Subdivision Ordinances

 

The Town of Menasha will be revising its Subdivision Control and Planned Unit Development Ordinance in 2003.

 

17.      Non-Metallic Mining Reclamation

 

The Town adopted this ordinance in 2000.

 

18.      Capital Improvement Program

 

A capital improvements program is a financial planning tool used by local units of government to map out a spending strategy. The typical capital improvements program usually outlines a five or six year spending plan for major equipment purchases (fire truck, computer system, etc.) and capital outlays (street reconstruction, debt refinancing, etc.) that will require major public expenditures of $10,000 or more. The capital improvements program (CIP) will prioritize the various expenditures or projects, provide cost estimates, and identify the funding source or sources (tax levy, grants, fees, etc.) necessary to accomplish the project.

 

As the Town of Menasha continues to grow and develop over the next 20 years, there will be a need for capital expenditures to provide additional services or equipment. This can best be accomplished by the preparing and adopting a CIP to implement the goals, objectives and policies and recommendations of the Comprehensive Plan. Once prepared, the CIP should be reviewed and updated annually by the Town Board.

 

19.      Impact Fees

 

The Town of Menasha, like other local units of government, needs to look at alternative funding sources as challenges to the traditional sources are made. One source that the Town is considering is impact fees.

 

According to Wisconsin State Statutes 66.0617, impact fees are defined as “ . . . cash contributions, contributions of land or interests in land or any other items of value that are imposed on a developer by a political subdivision” to pay for capital improvements within the community that are necessary to service or accommodate the new development.

 

Before a municipality can enact an impact feed ordinance, it must prepare a needs assessment for the public facilities which will be paid for in part by the impact fee. According to 66.0617, the assessment shall include, but not be limited to, the following:

 

Ø       An inventory of existing public facilities, including an identification of any existing deficiencies in the quantity or quality of those public facilities, for which it is anticipated that an impact fee may be imposed.

Ø       An identification of the new public facilities, or improvements or expansions of existing public facilities, that will be required because of land development for which it is anticipated that impact fees may be imposed. This identification shall be based on explicitly identified service areas and service standards.

Ø       A detailed estimate of the capital costs of providing the new public facilities or the improvements or expansions in existing public facilities including an estimate of the effect of recovering these capital costs through impact fees on the availability of affordable housing within the political subdivision.

 

To ensure fairness, impact fees can only be assessed (1) for capital improvements that are a direct consequence of the new development and (2) in an amount not to exceed the proportionate share required to serve the new development. In other words, a developer cannot be required to pay a disproportionate share of improvements that also benefit other persons (i.e., a bridge on the other side of town). This is spelled out in the standards in ss. 66.0617 where it states that impact fees:

 

Ø       Shall bear a rational relationship to the need for new, expanded or improved public facilities that are required to serve land development.

Ø       May not exceed the proportionate share of the capital costs that are required to serve land development, as compared to existing uses of land within the political subdivision.

Ø       Shall be based upon actual capital costs or reasonable estimates of capital costs for new, expanded or improved public facilities.

Ø       Shall be reduced to compensate for other capital costs imposed by the political subdivision with respect to land development to provide or pay for public facilities, including special assessments, special charges, land dedications or fees in lieu of land dedications or any other items of value.

Ø       Shall be reduced to compensate for moneys received from the federal or state government specifically to provide or pay for the public facilities for which the impact fees are imposed.

Ø       May not include amounts necessary to address existing deficiencies in public facilities.

Ø       Shall be payable by the developer to the political subdivision, either in full or in installment payments that are approved by the political subdivision, before a building permit may be issued or other required approval may be given by the political subdivision.

 

The Town should research the use of impact fees to determine their applicability in relieving the property tax burden on the residents of the Town.

 


C.    Integration of the Elements

 

During the planning process, care was taken to ensure consistency between the goals, objectives and policies and recommendations contained in each element of the Comprehensive Plan. The Town of Menasha Plan Commission will be responsible for comparing proposals for development that come before it with each element of the Comprehensive Plan. If the review of the development proposal uncovers inconsistencies between elements, the Plan Commission shall direct the Department of Community Development to analyze and report back on how the inconsistencies may be resolved.

 

The tools for implementation will also be reviewed to ensure consistency of decisions made by Town officials with the Comprehensive Plan goals, objectives, and policies and recommendations.

 

D.   Means to Measure Progress

 

The Town of Menasha Plan Commission will provide a written report at the Town’s Annual Meeting on the progress made in addressing the goals, objectives and policies and implementing the recommendations of the Comprehensive Plan.

 

E.     Method for Updating

 

The Town of Menasha Plan Commission will undertake an in depth review of the Comprehensive Plan in five years and a complete update in ten years. The process to adopt the update Comprehensive Plan is the same process used to adopt the original Plan.

 

The Town of Menasha may receive a development proposal that is in serious conflict with a goal, objective or policy or recommendation of the adopted Comprehensive Plan. If it is clear that the conflict should be addressed, an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan should be considered prior to or concurrent with the review of the development proposal. This amendment process should only occur once or twice each year, since more frequent amendments to the Comprehensive Plan will make it essentially meaningless as a planning tool because it can be changed at any time despite the effect of the proposed action on the general well-being of the community.