8. LAND USE

 

The discussion in sections A., B. and C. refers to Map XX Existing Land Use for the Town of Menasha.

 

A.   Characteristics of Major Land Uses

 

1.     Residential

 

Residential growth on the east side of the Town of Menasha over the past twenty years has occurred primarily in the area west of South Oneida Street and south of Midway Road. Residential growth in the Town’s west side has been focused in an area bounded by American Drive on the east, CTH CB on the west, West American Drive on the south and an east-west line about one mile north of East Shady Lane. Smaller concentrations of infill residential development have occurred east of Irish Road and south of Jacobsen Road and east and west of Irish Road, north of CTH II, and south of the Canadian National railroad tracks. In addition, large-lot single-family homes are scattered throughout the west side along Clayton Road, Irish Road, and East Shady Lane.

 

A significant new residential subdivision, Gateway Meadows, is part of the Gateway development north of USH 10 and west of CTH CB. Single, two and multi-family alternatives are part of the project.

 

The Town has experienced a change in the composition of the types of residential land uses. In 1980, multi-family residential acreage was less than five percent of the total residential acreage, and two-family or duplex acreage was less than three percent. By 2001, multi-family acreage had increased to over fifteen percent and two-family had increased to eleven percent. This increase reflects the change in the character of the Town from primarily a bedroom community where the primary land use is residential to an environment more like that of the surrounding incorporated municipalities where there is a mix of residential, commercial and industrial land uses.

 

Residents of the Town have expressed concern over the growth of multi-family residential development. From an acreage perspective, multi-family and two-family residential uses have increased significantly. What has not changed as dramatically is the percentage that single-family, two-family and multi-family units represent of the total number of residential units in the Town.

 

In 1980, single-family units made up about 68% of the total number of units, while two-family and multi-family combined for 28% of the total. In 1990, the single-family figure increased to 69% and the two- and multi-family figure decreased to 25%. Similar data for 2000 is not available at this time, but projections made based on building permit information would suggest the single-family percentage has decreased to 63% while the two-and multi-family number has increased to 32%.

 

Census figures on owner-occupied and renter-occupied housing in the Town of Menasha, as shown in Table 17 in the Housing Element Section, confirm that the Town, with about 70% of the housing units being owner-occupied and 30% being renter-occupied, is more similar to surrounding incorporated municipalities than it is to unincorporated towns.

 

A challenge for Town officials is to determine the appropriate mix of single, two and multi-family housing and the location of these types of housing. What can be inferred from the discussion above is that multi-family residential developments built over the last ten to twenty years are being constructed at a lower density than multi-family developments built prior to 1980. Density and design are important in ensuring a smooth visual transition from multi-family housing to single-family housing.

 

2.     Commercial

 

The focus of commercial development on the east side of the Town of Menasha has moved south from the Valley Fair Shopping Center to the intersection of Appleton Road and Midway Road. While most of the commercial land uses are located in the City of Menasha, their proximity to residents of the Town of Menasha on the east side make retail and personal and business services convenient. Other major areas of commercial development on the east side are located along South Oneida Street, Valley Road and Calumet Street.

 

Commercial development on the west side of the Town is focused along American Drive, south of CTH BB or Prospect Avenue, and is characterized by business-to-business services versus retail establishments. The McMahon Business Park and Parkside West offer environments for the former, while the Gateway Development project is proposing a mix of commercial activities including retail. It is expected that Gateway Development will be the focus of retail development on the west side of the Town. Smaller concentrations of commercial land uses are found along CTH BB east and west of USH 41 and in the southeast corner of the west side of the Town between USH 41 and Little Lake Buttes des Morts.

 

3.     Industrial

 

There are few industrial land uses on the east side of the Town. A warehouse and distribution facility is located in the far southeast corner south of STH 114. Several small uses are located along Valley Road, west of Appleton Road, and an inactive quarry is located north of 9th Street between De Pere Street and Mayer Street. Most industrial uses east of Little Lake Buttes des Morts are in the City of Menasha.

 

Kimberly Clark, the largest employer in the Town of Menasha, has several large sites on the west side of the Town. They are in the far southwest corner at CTH II and Clayton Road, at the southwest corner of Cold Spring Road and Jacobsen Road, between USH 41 and Little Lake Buttes des Morts south of Winchester Road, and between North Lake Street and Little Lake Buttes des Morts. Other major industrial sites include Great Northern Container located east of USH 41 and south of CTH BB; Pierce Manufacturing on American Drive; the All-American Industrial Park west of USH 41 and south of the Canadian National railroad tracks; and the SCA complex east of USH 41 and north of Winchester Road. There are also several quarry operations located in the north central area of the west side of the Town.

 

4.     Public and Recreational

 

With the completion of the Municipal Complex in 1997, the Town addressed the need for additional space for municipal operations including administrative, public works and police. Recent improvements have been made to Utility District facilities to accommodate additional demand for services.

 

The Town of Menasha updates its Parks and Open Space Plan every five years to respond to and plan for park and open space needs generated by additional residential growth. The Town owns land at the northeast corner of East Shady Lane and CTH CB, one use for which may be recreational activities. Further development of existing parkland is scheduled, and expansion of the trail system remains a priority for the Town.

 

5.     Agriculture and Vacant

 

Agriculture as a land use continues to diminish in the Town of Menasha. In 1980, about one-third of the land area was agricultural compared to about one-fifth of the land area in 2001, almost all of which is located in the west side of the Town. Portions of the agricultural land have been developed while other portions were removed from active agricultural use but remain vacant.

 

6.     Transportation

 

The construction of USH 10 and CTH CB, and the reconstruction of the USH 41 and 10 and STH 441 interchanges, has increased the amount of land used for transportation. The completion of STH 441 east of Little Lake Buttes des Morts occurred on land that had been designated for that use.

 

7.     Open Water and Woodlands

 

The Town of Menasha is fortunate to have Little Lake Buttes des Morts and the Fox River and adjoining wetlands as a significant land use feature. It should be a priority of the Town to protect and enhance this asset, as well as certain woodlands. Woodlands are scattered throughout the Town with no significant large concentrations.

 


B.   Trends in the Supply, Demand, and Price of Land

 

1.     Residential

 

In general, there is an adequate supply of land for residential development in the Town of Menasha, almost all of which is on the west side of the Town. There are approximately 250 acres zoned for single family that are available for development, 30 acres for two-family and 70 acres for multi-family. Plans were recently announced for the development of the only large, single-owner parcel on the east side of the Town available for residential development. This 11 acre property is north of Manitowoc Road between Goss Avenue on the west and Bartlein Court on the east. It is anticipated that this parcel will be annexed into the City of Menasha prior to development taking place.

 

Developers have been active in meeting the strong demand for single, two and multi-family housing. The strong demand is reflected in the fact that the price of residential land has been increasing at a rate higher than inflation. The cost of a lot for a single family home currently ranges from $25,000 to over $50,000. Recent sales for multi-family housing have been at $25,000 per acre and up.

 

2.     Commercial

 

There is a good supply of commercial property in the Town of Menasha. The McMahon Business Park, which opened in 1996, has sold 10 acres and has 20 acres remaining at $80,000 to $100,000 an acre. It is located at the intersection of USH 10 and CTH CB. Parkside West Business Center has sold two acres since it opened in 1994 and has 38 acres available priced between $25,000 and $50,000 an acre. It is located at the intersection of CTH CB and CTH II. Both of these developments target business-to-business firms offering services in contrast to the manufacturing, warehousing or distributing of a product.

 

Gateway Plaza is a 45-acre development that offers a multi-building corporate environment. Gateway Square is immediately adjacent to Gateway Plaza and offers approximately 60 acres for commercial/retail development. Both are located on the northwest corner of USH 10 and CTH CB.

 

There is vacant land for commercial and retail uses on the west side of the Town mixed in with land for industrial uses along American Drive both north and south of USH 10 and along CTH BB. The same situation is seen on the east side, but there is relatively little vacant land available for commercial and retail development. Future commercial and retail development on the east side will occur as a result of residential land uses in predominantly commercial areas transitioning to all commercial and retail.

 

Commercial land prices on the east side range from $125,000 to $250,000 per acre. The west side has recently experienced land sales of over $300,000 per acre. These land prices are reflective of the Fox Cities as a whole except for land in the immediate area of the Fox River Mall, where prices are even higher.

 

3.     Industrial

 

There is a need for industrial land in the Town of Menasha. The 280 acre, privately-owned All-American Industrial Park has sold over 270 acres over the past fourteen years, and currently has less than ten acres available. Smaller parcels are available along American Drive and CTH BB in areas that are a mix of heavy manufacturing and retail. It is expected that the extension of water and sewer along CTH BB will significantly increase the development potential of the area.

 

Firms today generally prefer to locate in an industrial or business park to ensure compatibility with surrounding land uses and the protection of development standards. While the McMahon Business Park and the Parkside West development have land available, they are more suited for business-to-business firms offering services in contrast to the manufacturing, warehousing or distributing of a product.

 

Research on recent land sales for industrial uses and asking prices for land zoned for industrial use shows per acre prices of $25,000 to over $50,000. Publicly owned land is at the lower end of that range while privately owned and developed industrial land is higher and depends on the location with respect to the transportation system. Land closest to USH 41 and USH 10 commands a premium over land located further away.

 

 


C.   Conflicts Between Adjacent Land Uses

 

There are numerous areas on the east side of the Town of Menasha where the potential exists for conflict between adjacent land uses. For example, commercial and industrial land uses along Valley Road are immediately adjacent to single-family homes. On the far southeast side, industrial land uses are located adjacent to residential and woodland properties. In the middle of the east side, residential land uses along Mayer Street are immediately adjacent to a quarry, which, while no longer active, is used for industrial purposes.

 

The west side also has several areas where there has been, continues to be or is the potential for conflict between adjacent land uses. Property owners adjacent to the railroad tracks have been vocal regarding noise issues. Residents near the wastewater treatment facility on Buttes des Morts Beach Road are subjected to odors. Discussions continue to be held on the implementation of an airport overlay zone that, if adopted, would have an impact on businesses and residents in the northeast quarter of the west side of the Town.

 

On both sides of the Town, homes that were built on single lots or in a group of a few lots have been surrounded, or have the potential to be surrounded, by non-residential land uses.

 

While the potential for conflict certainly exists in the Town of Menasha, it appears that landowners are, for the most part, co-existing with adjacent land uses dissimilar to their own, and conflict is at a low level. This does not mean that dissimilar, adjacent land use situations can be ignored nor can they continue in newly-developed areas.

 

 


D.  Development and Redevelopment Opportunities

 

In this section, areas of the Town of Menasha are identified that should be the focus of Neighborhood Development Plans (see Map XX). A neighborhood development plan addresses in detail the development and redevelopment needs of a specific area. While the term “neighborhood” is generally associated with a residential area, in this plan the term is used to describe areas that may contain one or a combination of land uses. The neighborhood will typically be a rectangular or circular area with a radius of ¼ mile or less. Some will be lineal or long and narrow because they are defined by a segment of the transportation system.

 

1.           Valley Fair Mall Neighborhood

 

This is the area bounded by the Valley Fair Mall on the west, Wilson Avenue on the south and the boundary with the City of Appleton on the north and east. It is characterized by high density multi-family housing and small retail and commercial structures. As one of the oldest developed areas in the Town, attention should be paid to maintaining it’s viability in the marketplace.

 

2.           Valley Road Neighborhood

 

The one mile stretch of Valley Road west of Appleton Road is characterized by a mix of commercial, industrial, residential and public land uses. Traffic access, storm water management and commercial-residential transitions are  issues in this neighborhood.

 

3.           Appleton Road Neighborhood

 

This is a lineal neighborhood extending from STH 441 to 9th Street. The cooperation that was exhibited by the Town of Menasha and the City of Menasha in the construction of sidewalks along Appleton Road will be needed again in planning for the future transition of residential properties along Appleton Road to commercial properties.

 

4.           Mayer Street Neighborhood

 

This is an area adjacent to the Badger Highways quarry where some of the oldest residential housing in the Town of Menasha is located. While no longer being actively mined, processing of mined materials does take place in the quarry. Because of the age of some of the residential structures in this neighborhood, housing rehabilitation is a potential activity. Storm water drainage is also an issue in this neighborhood.

 

5.           Racine Street/9th Street Neighborhood

 

Due to the high volumes of traffic and the resulting backup of vehicles, the reconstruction of the intersection of Racine Street and 9th Street is a possibility. Access to adjacent properties will be an issue, and will need to be balanced against the safe flow of traffic. The compatibility of surrounding land uses with the possible street improvements will need to be evaluated.

 

6.           CTH BB Neighborhood

 

The planned extension of water and sewer to properties along the south side of CTH BB between American Drive and CTH CB will serve as a stimulus to the further development and redevelopment of this linear neighborhood. The commercial value of this neighborhood has been demonstrated recently with land sales in the $100,000 to $200,000 per acre range.

 

7.           CTH CB West Neighborhood

 

This neighborhood, one of the largest discussed in this plan, is located east of Irish Road, south of CTH BB, west of CTH CB, and north of the land on which the Town of Menasha’s Municipal Complex is located. The neighborhood has a number of assets, including gently sloping topography, natural features such as environmental corridors and woodlands, and access to the transportation system. This neighborhood provides an opportunity for Smart Growth Development concepts.

 

8.           USH 10 & West American Drive Neighborhood

 

The location of transportation improvements has always dictated where development will take place. An example is the construction of USH 10 and the frontage road of West American Drive. This long, lineal neighborhood stretches along the entire length of USH 10 from the USH 41 interchange west to the Town of Clayton. This neighborhood is an opportunity for the Town of Menasha to promote the type of development that is representative of the quality, style and design desired by the leaders and residents of the Town.

 

9.           USH 10 and CTH CB Interchange Neighborhood

 

This neighborhood, south of USH 10 and west of CTH CB, is another example of development opportunities being generated by transportation improvements. The stream corridor and woodlands provides a natural background and boundary for the development of the neighborhood.

 

10.      Winchester Road and Lake Street Neighborhood

 

This neighborhood, a mix of residential, industrial, and commercial land uses, is located south of Winchester Road, east of the Canadian National railroad tracks and west of Lake Street. A reduction in the different types of land uses in this neighborhood would be desirable.

 

11.      Fritse Park Neighborhood

 

Fritse Park is a small, five acre park off of North Lake Street along the west shore of Little Lake Buttes des Morts. It is immediately adjacent to the abandoned railroad line and bridge that the Town of Menasha and the City of Menasha are cooperatively developing into a recreational trail. Opportunities for the expansion of the park should be explored.

 

12.      North Lake Street and STH 441 Neighborhood

 

Further north on North Lake Street and just south of the STH 441 bridge is an undeveloped area with approximately 1,000 feet of frontage on Little Lake Buttes des Morts. This neighborhood offers the opportunity to provide more public access to one of the Town’s most valuable natural resources.

 

13.      Stroebe Island Neighborhood

 

While this neighborhood has experienced substantial development over the years, it remains an outstanding environmental asset for the Town. Protection of this environment should be a priority of the Town and the residents who call this neighborhood home.

 

14.      The Quarries

 

While not a typical neighborhood, the presence of six quarries in the Town presents opportunities to support and influence the reclamation plans required for each of the quarries. Each should be evaluated for integration into the surrounding area and the possible range of redevelopment alternatives.

 

Four neighborhoods have been identified as a Neighborhood Discussion Areas (see Map XX). The difference between the neighborhoods just discussed and a neighborhood designated as a NDA is that in a regular neighborhood, the existing and future land uses are readily apparent. Typically there is a dominant land use that should be maintained in reviewing development and redevelopment opportunities. In a NDA neighborhood, the projected future land uses are not as readily apparent. There may be a mix of land uses, none of which are dominant, or the land may be undeveloped and the preferred land use will need to be discovered. NDA’s are generally areas in which a significant transition or change in the land use can be expected to be one of the issues addressed by the Town and its residents. Once the future land use has been determined, a neighborhood development plan can be completed.

 

NDA #1 - CTH CB East Neighborhood

 

This neighborhood is located east of CTH CB and north of East Shady Lane. The Town of Menasha has owned this property since the early 1960’s. Several concepts have been suggested for the development of this neighborhood, including a “do nothing” alternative. In 1999, residents of the Town voted at the Annual Meeting to not sell the property. They also voted that if was to be sold, it could only be sold for park purposes. It is a very visible neighborhood and could provide the Town with an opportunity to demonstrate Smart Growth development concepts.

 

NDA #2 - East Shady Lane and Arena Drive Neighborhood

 

This neighborhood is located just west of American Drive and has the full range of land uses from vacant to residential to commercial to industrial. Development proposals for this neighborhood have generated much interest in the past. The Tri-County Arena is located in this neighborhood. A study recently released by Winnebago County concluded the County should continue to co-own the Tri-County Arena with Outagamie County. The challenge will be to create a smooth transition of compatible land uses in the neighborhood.

 

NDA #3 - West American Drive & Cold Spring Road Neighborhood

 

This is an area within the USH 10 and West American Drive Neighborhood that potentially could accommodate a wide range of land uses. As with the East Shady Lane and Arena Drive neighborhood, the challenge will be to create a smooth transition of compatible land uses in the neighborhood.

 

NDA #4 - St. Mary’s Central Neighborhood

 

This neighborhood is bounded by Cold Spring Road on the west, Jacobsen Road on the north and American Drive on the east and south. The neighborhood is a mix of residential, industrial, commercial and public uses. Special attention will be needed to maintain the separation of uses where necessary and to encourage or discourage proposed developments based on their compatibility.

 


E.   Limitations on Development

 

A summary of the limitations on development is presented in this section,. A more detailed discussion of these limitations is in the Utilities and Community Facilities Element and the Agricultural, Natural and Cultural Resources Element.

 

1.     Productive Agricultural Soils

 

It is the intent of the Town of Menasha to protect productive agricultural land and discourage residential development outside of the Sewer Service Area by prohibiting multi-lot platted subdivisions and by limiting single lot rural residential development.

 

2.     Environmentally Sensitive Areas

 

The East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission identifies environmentally sensitive areas as part of its regional land use and water quality planning process.

 

a.     Lakes and Streams

 

Little Lake Buttes des Morts (and the Fox River) is the dominant water feature in the Town of Menasha. It is both a natural and a recreational resource. Development will be limited to recreational uses that do not significantly impact the beauty and quality of this resource and are in compliance with the Winnebago County Shoreland District Zoning Ordinance.

 

There are several smaller stream corridors that feed into Little Lake Buttes des Morts that will also be protected from development through the enforcement of the Shoreland District Zoning Ordinance.

 

b.     Wetlands

 

The Town’s major wetland is in the Stroebe Island area. While significant residential development has taken place on Stroebe Island, it is expected that little, if any, further development will take place because of the importance of this environmentally sensitive area.

 

c.      Floodways

 

Development activity in and near floodways is regulated by the Winnebago County Floodplain Zoning Ordinance.

 

3.     Limiting Environmental Conditions

 

The East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission also identifies environmental conditions that limit development. While these conditions may not prohibit development, they are to be considered during the development approval process.

 

a.     Seasonal High Groundwater

 

While development has taken place in areas with high groundwater, future development should be discouraged in these areas.

 

b.     Floodplains

 

Development activity in and near floodplains is regulated by the Winnebago County Floodplain Zoning Ordinance.

 

c.      Shallow Bedrock

 

While development has taken place in areas with high groundwater, future development should be discouraged in these areas.

 

d.     Steep Slopes

 

With the exception of the eastern shoreline of Little Lake Butte des Mort, which is developed, steep slopes are not an issue in the Town of Menasha.

 

4.     Boundary of Utility Service and Community Facilities

 

a.     Utility Services

 

The Town of Menasha’s Utility District covers the entire Town. The District has an adequate water supply to accommodate the growth projected to occur by 2020. Extension of water mains and services will be needed.

 

There is available capacity with the major sewer interceptors and wastewater treatment plants on the east and west sides of the Town of Menasha to accommodate growth. In 2004, the East Central Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission will be updating the Fox Cities Sewer Service Area Plan. Improvements needed, if any, to accommodate the growth projected to occur by 2020 will be identified through this process.

 

Storm water management will be an important factor in evaluating future development. The Town of Menasha is currently discussing how aggressive an approach should be taken to the management of storm water.

 

There do not appear to be any issues or concerns with solid waste disposal, telecommunications or electric and gas services.

 

b.     Community Facilities

 

It appears the projected increase in population will not generate any demand in the short term for a significant increase in municipal services provided by the Town of Menasha.

 

NOTE: The future land use map is currently being reviewed by the Town of Menasha police and fire departments and the Town of Menasha Utility District staff. The objective is to identify changes in staffing and services that may be necessary to serve the areas projected to develop by 2020.

 


F.    Land Use Projections

 

1.     Residential

 

Tables 23 and 24 were presented earlier in the Housing Element. Table 23 displayed the impact of the projected rise in the Town’s population in terms of the number of housing units that would be needed. Table 24 projected the number of acres, in five-year increments, that would be needed to accommodate the housing units. Table 24 is shown again below.

 

TABLE 24

ACRES NEEDED BASED ON PROJECTED HOUSING UNITS

Town of Menasha

 

Year

Current

Projected

2000

2050

2010

2015

2020

Total Housing Units –

Current and Projected Additional

6,298

447

394

421

381

 

 

 

 

 

 

Single and Two-Family

 

 

 

 

 

Occupied Units - Current and Projected Additional

4,485

313

276

295

267

Vacancy Rate

1.011

1.03

1.03

1.03

1.03

Total Number of Units Adjusted for Vacancy

4,534

322

284

304

275

Number of Units per Acre

2.79

3.00

4.00

4.00

5.00

Number of Acres Developed

1,623

1,730

1,801

1,877

1,932

Number of Acres Available/(Needed)

242

135

64

(12)

(67)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multi-Family

 

 

 

 

 

Occupied Units - Current and Projected Additional

1,813

134

118

126

114

Vacancy Rate

1.055

1.05

1.05

1.05

1.05

Total Number of Units Adjusted for Vacancy

1,913

141

124

133

120

Number of Units per Acre

7.06

9.00

10.00

10.00

10.00

Number of Acres Developed

271

287

299

312

324

Number of Acres Available/(Needed)

54

38

26

13

1

Source: US Census, Town of Menasha and Martenson & Eisele, Inc.

 

In making these projections, it has been assumed that 70% of the additional housing units will be for single- and two-family development and 30% will be for multi-family development. It was also assumed that the density for single-family and two-family residential units would be three units per acre by 2005 and increase to five units per acre in 2020. The density for multi-family developments would be nine units per acre in 2005 and increased to ten units per acre by 2020.

 

These projections were made based on the assumption that the land currently zoned for single, two and multi-family residential uses is located in areas desired by homeowners and renters. The reality is that market trends, land ownership, individual preferences and numerous other factors all affect the viability of any particular residentially zoned property. In addition, some existing housing may be converted to other uses, and vacant land zoned for residential may be rezoned for other land uses.

 

a.     Single- and Two-Family Development (Low Density)

 

In 2000, the Town of Menasha had approximately 242 acres of undeveloped land zoned for single and two-family housing. An initial analysis shows that based on densities of three to five units per acre, 309 acres will be developed by 2020, which is 67 acres more than is currently zoned for future growth. Further analysis reveals several factors that will influence the total number of acres that will be developed and where the development will occur.

 

While the Town of Menasha will encourage compact development and low density development of five units per acre, it is possible that residential development projects will be proposed at a density of less than five units per acre. The result will be the need for more land than shown in the projections. A second factor is that portions of the 242 acres have been developed over the past eighteen months. And finally, a parcel by parcel analysis of the vacant, unplatted land zoned for single family development reveals several parcels that are unlikely to develop due to ownership situations, environmental conditions or a projected change in zoning to a non-residential use. For example, several parcels are outside of the Sewer Service Area. Another area is located between the Canadian National Railroad tracks and wetlands in the area of Stroebe Island.

 

Based on these factors, the Town of Menasha Future Land Use Plan will show more than 309 acres of future low density residential development.

 

b.     Multi-Family Development (Medium and High Density)

 

The Town had 54 acres of undeveloped land zoned for multi-family housing in 2000. An initial analysis shows that based on a projected density of ten units per acre, 53 of the 54 acres will be developed by 2020. Further analysis shows that portions of the 54 acres have been developed over the past eighteen months or are located in areas that may be unsuitable for multi-family development due to environmental conditions. One of the larger parcels is located near the Tri-County Ice Arena where neighborhood opposition to the development of multi-family housing has been strong. In addition, some multi-family development will occur at a density of less than 10 units per acre.

 

Based on these factors, the Town of Menasha Future Land Use Plan will show more than 54 acres of future medium and high density residential development.

 

c.      Active Subdivisions

 

There are four active subdivisions in the Town of Menasha, all of which are located on the west side. Gateway Meadows is located north of USH 10 between Irish Road and Clayton Avenue and offers parcels for single, two and multi-family residential structures. Based on lot prices, Gateway Meadows is targeting the middle to upper end of the market. High Plain Meadows is located north of East Shady Lane and west of Cold Spring Road, and is targeting first-time or entry level single homeowners. Wildlife Heights is located north of the Canadian National railroad tracks and east of Irish Road. This subdivision offers a range of first-time and move-up opportunities. Golf Village is located west of American Drive and north of West American Drive and is characterized by middle to upper end homes.

 

d.     Areas Projected to be Developed

 

In keeping with the Smart Growth concept of compact development, it is projected that areas adjacent to the subdivisions just mentioned will be the location of future residential land use. The area north of High Plain Meadows is anticipated to develop within the next five years followed by the area to the west over the next 10- 20 years. It is projected that the area to the south of Wildlife Heights will develop for residential purposes within the next 10 years. Land south of USH 10 between CTH CB and Irish Road is also projected to become the location of single-family homes in the last half of the 20 year planning period.

 

There are a number of lots in older subdivisions that are available for in-fill development. In addition, there are a few older farmhouses and houses that possibly may be acquired, demolished and replaced with one or more new residential structures.

 

2.     Commercial

 

Planners typically use a ratio of the number of residents in a community to the number of acres used for commercial activities to project how many additional acres of land are needed over the next five, ten fifteen and twenty years. This method works best for a “stand alone” type of community that is surrounded by unincorporated and undeveloped municipalities. Because the Town of Menasha is just one of the many municipalities that make up the Fox Cities, this method is not a good predictor of the future need for commercial land uses in the Town.

 

The Town of Menasha has chosen, instead, to use existing development patterns to project where the development and redevelopment of future commercial land uses will occur. The major driver is the transportation pattern followed by the residential land use pattern.

 

The development pattern for commercial development on the east side of the Town is predictable because of the lack of vacant land for commercial uses and the transportation system is in place. Most new commercial development will occur along Appleton Road with a majority of it resulting from the transition of residential land uses to commercial.

 

Commercial development on the west side is projected to occur in several areas. The primary focus will be along USH 10, and especially in the Gateway development along West American Drive between Cold Spring Road and Irish Road. The intersections of CTH CB with USH 10, Jacobsen Road, and CTH II are projected to be areas in which commercial development will occur. In-fill commercial is projected to occur along American Drive between CTH BB and East Shady Lane.

 

3.     Industrial

 

The same approach that was used for projecting future commercial land uses was used to project the location of future development and redevelopment opportunities for industrial land use purposes.

 

There are three major areas on the east side that are projected to continue as industrial areas. They are Valley Road between Appleton Road and Racine Street, the west side of Earl Street north of Appleton Road and the warehousing and distribution facility on Brighton Beach Road.

 

The west side of the Town of Menasha is projected to be anchored by industrial land uses in all four corners. Kimberly Clark is a major land owner in the southeast and southwest sides. Pierce Manufacturing and Great Northern Container are the major players on the northeast side. The northwest side is projected to become home to a new business park located between CTH CB and Irish Road and south of CTH BB.

 

Some in-fill development may occur in the southeast and northeast portions of the Town’s west side. The extension of sewer and water along CTH BB west of American Drive will spur additional industrial growth in that area.

 

 


G.  Land Use Vision

 

It is the year 2020. The Town of Menasha has successfully implemented its land use plan. Describe the development pattern in the Town of Menasha in terms of the major land use categories – residential, commercial, industrial, public, recreational, and agricultural.

 

Ø       What land use issues present in 2002 were successfully addressed?

 

Ø       How does the 2020 development pattern compare to the development pattern in 2002? Is it more compact, about the same or less compact?

 

Ø       How was the pattern affected by the desire to preserve agricultural land environmentally sensitive areas like woodland and wetlands?

 

Ø       How was the pattern affected by the desire to continue to encourage economic development?

 

Ø       How was the pattern affected by the changing demographics of the Town and the desire to provide a range of housing units?

 

Ø       How was the pattern affected by current and proposed improvements to the transportation system?

 

Ø       How was the pattern affected by the desire to encourage development to areas already serviced with utilities and community facilities?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


H.  Land Use Goals, Objectives and Policies

 

1.     Goal

 

To provide for orderly growth and development that ensures the character, magnitude and location of all land uses are considered in achieving a balanced natural, physical, and economic environment, and contributes to the general health, safety and welfare of the Town’s residents and property owners.

 

2.     Objectives

 

a.     Develop and adopt a Land Use Plan that guides the public and private sectors in making decisions on the development and redevelopment of land in the Town of Menasha, and provides for a complete range of land uses in the areas most appropriate for such uses.

 

b.     Develop and adopt new regulatory tools, and revise and re-adopt existing regulatory tools needed to promote compact development in areas that can be efficiently served by existing Town services.

 

c.      Amend the existing zoning map to be consistent with the recommendations of the Comprehensive Plan and neighborhood development plans. When necessary, draft and adopt new ordinances and development standards to implement the goals, objectives, and recommendations of the Comprehensive Plan and the neighborhood development plans.

 

d.     Develop and adopt Neighborhood Development Plans for areas in the Town where development or redevelopment is desired.

 

e.     Develop and adopt a Town-administered zoning ordinance.

 

3.     Policies

 

a.     The Town shall require all decisions and actions concerning land use development and redevelopment in the Town of Menasha to be consistent with the Comprehensive Plan.

 

b.     The Town shall require that all non-agricultural development located within the Town of Menasha’s Sewer Service Area be served by municipal services.

 

c.      The Town shall discourage residential development on land that is not in the Town’s Sewer Service Area.

 

d.     The Town shall encourage the development of vacant and under-utilized land within the Sewer Service Area that can be served by existing municipal services and facilities and transportation systems.

 

e.     The Town shall use the Site Plan Review process to improve the visual quality and physical design of the Town of Menasha by developing and continuing to enforce signage, landscaping, property maintenance, building design, parking and loading and outdoor storage regulations which foster high quality urban development.

 

f.       The Town shall use the Site Plan Review process to reduce the potential for conflict between potentially incompatible land uses by requiring adequate mitigation measures such as buffer yards, vegetative or structural screening, sound-proofing, traffic access control and directed parking lot lighting.

 

g.     The Town shall use the Site Plan Review process to address storm water management problems associated with increasing urbanization by requiring new development to provide on-site storm water management facilities.

 

h.     The Town shall use the Site Plan Review process to encourage the use of innovative land use design and development tools and techniques such as planned unit development, transit-oriented development, cluster development and conservation development to foster compact, pedestrian-oriented and mixed use developments.

 

i.       The Town shall use the Site Plan Review process to prohibit development from locating in wetlands, 100-year floodplains, and delineated conservation and environmentally sensitive areas.

 

j.       The Town shall establish, adopt, and implement density and intensity standards for all future land uses.

 

k.     The Town shall encourage the concentration of higher density and intensity growth in and around areas that are adequately served by transportation facilities, public utilities, and community services and facilities.

 

l.       The Town shall encourage a broad range of residential land use densities to satisfy the housing preferences and income levels of all residents.

 

m.  The Town shall promote development of commercial areas that are convenient to the public and integrated with surrounding land uses and the transportation system.

 

n.     The Town shall encourage, and provide land for, industrial development that through appropriate zoning district designation and adherence to proper planning principles, will foster a diversified economic base while not being detrimental to the Town’s aesthetics and quality of life.

 

o.     The Town shall require the dedication and construction of frontage roads, interconnected parking lots and/or shared driveways to minimize the number of access points on major roads.

 

p.     The Town shall encourage the modification of the Town/County Zoning Ordinance to provide criteria to accommodate innovative land development techniques.

 

q.     The Town shall approve deviations from the recommendations in the Comprehensive Plan only in the context of a formal amendment or a Town adopted detailed neighborhood development plan.

 

r.      The Town shall annually review the Land Use Element of the Comprehensive Plan to identify amendments needed for the Plan to continue to effectively guide land use development decisions.

 

s.      The Town will coordinate its Land Use Plan with the plans of adjacent municipalities to avoid land use conflicts at borders.

 


I.     Land Use Plan

 

1.  Introduction

 

The land use plan for the Town of Menasha is where the goals, objectives and policies are visually represented. Here is where the impact of the population projections, the historical and projected changes in the demographics of the community, the projected densities of different types of residential development, the transportation pattern and systems, the protection of natural resources and more become real for the residents of the Town of Menasha.

 

The key issues and drivers that have been the focus of the meetings with the Town of Menasha Planning Commission were reviewed and analyzed in preparing a draft future land use plan for the Town of Menasha. Some of the key issues and drivers included:

 

Ø       Change in demographics

Ø       Change in household size and structure

Ø       Recent and planned transportation improvements

Ø       Protection of agricultural, natural and cultural resources

Ø       Promotion of economic development

 

The draft land use plan was the subject of two public forums held on May 16, 2002 at the Town of Menasha Municipal Complex and on May 23, 2002 at the Town of Menasha Community Center.

 

Presentations were made on the Smart Growth Comprehensive Planning Process by Alvin Bellmer, Chairperson of the Town of Menasha Planning Commission and George Dearborn, Director of Community Development for the Town of Menasha. Jonathan Bartz, Principal Planner for Martenson & Eisele, made a presentation on past, present and future land use in the Town of Menasha.

 

Town residents who attended the public forums were given the opportunity to review a draft future land use plan for the Town of Menasha, ask questions of the Town’s staff and consultant, and make suggestions on future land use in the Town of Menasha. Below is a list of the areas that generated the largest amount of questions and suggestions:

 

Ø       The projected industrial or business park located on the west side of CTH CB north of the Town of Menasha Municipal Complex

Ø       The property owned by the Town of Menasha located on the east side of CTH CB north of East Shady Lane

Ø       Projected future land uses along West American Drive between Millpond Lane and Cold Spring Road

Ø       Projected future land uses surrounding the Tri-County Ice Arena.

Ø       The desire for residential development to be low density versus medium or high density

 

The Town’s staff and consultant reviewed the suggestions and comments in developing a second draft of the Future Land Use Plan that was presented to the Town of Menasha Planning Commission on July 17, 2002. Based on the discussion at that meeting, a final draft of the Future Land Use Plan was prepared for inclusion on the Town of Menasha web site and for the presentation of the draft of the Smart Growth Comprehensive Plan at a public hearing in the fall of 2002.

 

1.     Recommendation on Land Outside of the Sewer Service Area

 

It is the intent of the Town of Menasha to protect productive agricultural land and discourage residential development outside of the Sewer Service Area by prohibiting multi-lot platted subdivisions and by limiting single lot rural residential development.

 

Traditionally, municipalities have limited single lot residential development through the requirement of a minimum lot size of, for example, 35 acres. This has resulted in land being removed from productive agricultural use and scattered residential development that can be accurately described as urban sprawl. Smart growth discourages urban sprawl and encourages compact development.

 

While the Town would like to protect productive agricultural land and discourage residential development outside of the Sewer Service Area, it also recognizes that urban development will continue to occur and that at some point in the future, agricultural land uses will no longer exist in the Town. The challenge is to manage the transition of the land in the Town currently outside of the Sewer Service Area so that when it does become part of the Area, services can be provided efficiently and economically.

 

To address this challenge, this plan suggests a new approach to the protection of productive agricultural soils and the encouragement of compact development in areas outside of the Sewer Service Area. The basic concept is to adopt a maximum lot size instead of a minimum lot size and to restrict the number of lots that can be created out of a larger parcel of land. The following requirements would apply as of (date to be determined) to all properties in the Town of Menasha that are not in the Sewer Service Area:

 

Ø       Existing properties of less than 35 acres cannot be further subdivided.

Ø       Contiguous parcels with single ownership of 35 acres or more with an existing dwelling can be subdivided so as to have no more than two (2) additional rural residential lots of two (2) acres or less.

Ø       Contiguous parcels with single ownership of 35 acres or more with existing residential dwellings can be subdivided so as to have no more than three (3) rural residential lots of two (2) acres or less.

Ø       Rural residential lots would be limited to a maximum of two (2) acres.

Ø       Clustering of the rural residential lots would be encouraged.

Ø       Rural residential lots would be required to have 100 feet of frontage on an existing public street.

 

It is recommended that the applicable ordinances and regulations be reviewed for possible changes that may be needed.

 

2.     Recommendation on Neighborhood Development Plan Areas

 

It is recommended that the Neighborhood Development Plan Areas be reviewed and prioritized.

 

3.     Recommendation on Neighborhood Discussion Areas

 

It is recommended that planning workshops be scheduled for each of the four Neighborhood Discussion Areas. The workshops should be completed by 2004.

 

4.     ???